Many believe that romance is somehow a numbers game—the more we play, the better the odds. Last week, Ok Cupid VP of Engineering Tom Jacques and Fisher, who is also Match.com's scientific advisor, came together at Intelligence Squared to argue that dating apps are designed to find love.Their opponents, WNYC's co-author Eric Klinenberg, argued that online dating has killed romance.But even though love is one of the most basic human instincts, it's not an easy one to master.

Romance isn't quantifiable by numbers or statistics, so it isn't easy to define, but listen to love songs or watch a romantic comedy, and you'll recognize the unmistakable symptoms of this infatuating feeling called love. "Everything about them becomes special—the street they live on, the music that they like. You get elated when things are going well, have mood swings when things are going poorly.

But what you really want them to do is to call, to write, to ask you out, and to tell you that they love you." We've all been there—we've all felt that pang in our hearts for that one person that we simply cannot get out of our minds.

Back in the day, the vast majority of people would meet their partners through loose social connections – people linked to their friendship group, through mutual friends, at church, through their families, etc.

But this all changed with the advent of online dating.

"You have to deal with all the extremely unromantic difficult behavior, whether it's rating people by what they look like or dealing with extremely rude, racist, sexist comments," argued Zomorodi.

We can also argue that online dating is a .7-billion-a-year industry and that the data recorded by these companies doesn't necessarily translate into a winning algorithm.

"To be vulnerable with someone is what love requires, but that's the hardest thing.

And I think it's harder these days because we have these ways of sheltering ourselves and being meeker about how we ask someone out.

While most heterosexual couples still meet their partners in this way, online dating is the second most common way, and for homosexual couples, online dating is by far the most popular – a trend with important social implications, the researchers suggest.