Abandoned for much of the medieval and post-medieval period, modern Amman dates to the late 19th century when Circassian immigrants were settled there by the Ottoman Empire in 1867.The first municipal council was established in 1909.

Ptolemy II Philadelphus, the Macedonian ruler of Egypt, who occupied and rebuilt the city, named it "Philadelphia" (Ancient Greek: One of the most original monuments in Jordan, and perhaps in the Hellenistic period in the Near East, is the village of Iraq Al-Amir in the valley of Wadi Al-Sir, southwest of Amman, which is home to Qasr Al-Abd (Castle of the Slave).

Other nearby ruins include a village, an isolated house and a fountain, all of which are barely visible today due to the damage brought by a major earthquake that hit the region in the year 362.

The ruins of Rujm Al-Malfouf consist of a stone watchtower used to ensure protection of their capital and several store rooms to the east.

The Greeks founded new cities in the area of modern-day Jordan, including Umm Qays, Jerash and Amman.

The neolithic site of 'Ain Ghazal was found in the outskirts of Amman.

At its height, around 7000 BC, it had an area of 15 hectares (37 acres) and was inhabited by ca.

It is expected that in the next 10 years these three cities will capture the largest share of multinational corporation activity in the region.

Amman derives its name from the 13th century BC when the Ammonites named it "Rabbath Ammon", with the term Rabbath meaning the "Capital" or the "King's Quarters".

Ammonites worshiped an ancient deity called Moloch.